Infected Worldmind

Politics and Culture. A Tonic.

Who am I?

A happy father. A lucky husband. A lawyer and development professional.

I blog at Between the Stations and occasionally contribute to Funnybook Babylon. My ever-expanding bookshelf is here. I infrequently write about food and take pictures.

That's everything.
Recent Tweets @jamaal30

we are here
slaving for sovereignty by selling freedom
into the captivity of patriotism.
we are here silent, brainwashed
we are here
poor, frightened, and angry
wondering who is the next torture victim or petrol-
bomb casualty.
we are here, clutching at a fragile economy
a disintegrating social system.

we are here feasting on propaganda
starving,
while poets sing praise litanies
to dictators.
we are here
queuing for basic commodities
chasing sky-rocketing prices
doing business in an unstable environment
we are here where the dollar is extinct
and millionaires are homeless

mother, what happened to the breadbasket of Africa?
sister, what happened to Africa’s paradise?
brother, what happened to the sunshine city
and that of Kings?

we are here honouring the zhing-zhong products flooding the
market while home industry gathers dust in
derelict shelves.
well, we are here,
grounded,
wondering where, when and how
we lost our bearings.

-Cosmas Mairosi, from Poetry International Web, 2007. via 3 Quarks Daily.

I think there is a contest here in the world today where there are basically … three models. There’s autocratic governments trying to take advantage of market opportunities—what [Hungarian Prime Minister] Viktor Orbán embraced the other day, authoritarian capitalism [1]. And then there are nonnational, nongovernmental forces like Boko Haram [and] the IS in Iraq and Syria, who believe that the most important thing they can do is to be effective forces of destruction … The third forces are the ones that I tried to help dominate in the 1990s and have worked for since in the private sector, in the nongovernmental sector: the people who believe that … if we are interdependent, we basically [have] to define the terms of our interdependence in positive ways. That requires more shared prosperity, more shared responsibilities in the form of inclusive governments, and a vigorous private and nongovernmental sector—and at the core believing that what we have in common is more important than our differences, and that we have to quit fighting over a meager pie and try to build a future together.

creepedoutsarah:

like my coworkers and this ray rice shit fuck you seriously

(via sabrinadropkick)

illogicalvolume:

bona to vada.jpg

(From Doom Patrol #63, ‘The Empire of Chairs’, by Grant Morrison and Richard Case)

I’ve been holding off on writing post like this for a while now because I thought it was better not to say anything at all than to say something stupid, but I’m speaking up now for two reasons:

  1. Because it currently seems possible that Scotland, as a nation, might vote for independence

and…

  1. Because it still doesn’t seem likely

If I didn’t think there was any chance of a YES vote there’d be no reason to climb up on my soapbox, but since it seems as though it won’t happen the next few weeks are my last chance to say why I think it should.

You are of course welcome to breeze by me as quickly as you would any other Buchanan Street barker but if you fancy hearing me out, here we go!

Read More

James Brown on domestic violence and the responsibility of men to do more. I’m impressed by his focus on the broader culture of disrespect towards women in our society.

Monsters are our children. They can be pushed to the farthest margins of geography and discourse, hidden away at the edges of the world and in the forbidden recesses of our mind, but they always return. And when they come back, they bring not just a fuller knowledge of our place in history and the history of knowing our place, but they bear self-knowledge, human knowledge - and a discourse all the more sacred as it arises from the Outside. These monsters ask us how we perceive the world, and how we have misrepresented what we have attempted to place. They ask us to reevaluate our cultural assumptions about race, gender, sexuality, our perception of difference, our tolerance toward its expression. They ask us why we have created them.
Jeffrey Jerome Cohen, “Monster Culture: Seven Theses” (via theagonistes)

I like this quote a lot.

(via sea-change)

aleskot:

ZERO Vol. 2: At the Heart of It All comes out this Wednesday. For those of you who don’t know, Zero is a comics series/series of graphic novels I co-create with a whole lot of amazing artists, a rather ideal colorist, a rather ideal designer and a rather ideal letterer. The basic premise is "What would happen if James Bond existed?" and then it gets rather dark and complex. 

In advance of the second collection dropping in two days, we decided to share what we do for free, and therefore we present chapter nine.
Chapter nine is, as all other chapters so far, self-contained and simultaneously an important part of the larger whole. It’s set in 1993 Bosnia. It is, at least to me, the saddest issue of them all, and there’s a rather haunted quality to it. 
You can get it via:
The Image Comics Website
Comixology
iTunes
Google Play
Dropbox

And that’s it, I believe. The release is limited — you can only download it for a few days and then the links go dead or revert to pay-to-play. 
If you don’t have Zero vol. 1 and want to get it, there’s a multitude of options, including your local comic book store, bookstores (such as the tremendous McNally-Jackson bookstore in Soho, NY), Amazon, Comixology, iTunes, the Image Comics website and (probably) more. 
Welcome to Zero.

aleskot:

ZERO Vol. 2: At the Heart of It All comes out this Wednesday. For those of you who don’t know, Zero is a comics series/series of graphic novels I co-create with a whole lot of amazing artists, a rather ideal colorist, a rather ideal designer and a rather ideal letterer. The basic premise is "What would happen if James Bond existed?" and then it gets rather dark and complex. 

In advance of the second collection dropping in two days, we decided to share what we do for free, and therefore we present chapter nine.

Chapter nine is, as all other chapters so far, self-contained and simultaneously an important part of the larger whole. It’s set in 1993 Bosnia. It is, at least to me, the saddest issue of them all, and there’s a rather haunted quality to it. 

You can get it via:

The Image Comics Website

Comixology

iTunes

Google Play

Dropbox

And that’s it, I believe. The release is limited — you can only download it for a few days and then the links go dead or revert to pay-to-play. 

If you don’t have Zero vol. 1 and want to get it, there’s a multitude of options, including your local comic book store, bookstores (such as the tremendous McNally-Jackson bookstore in Soho, NY), Amazon, Comixology, iTunes, the Image Comics website and (probably) more. 

Welcome to Zero.

(via essentiallydazzling)

brianmichaelbendis:

Page from WARLOCK #10 by Jim Starlin and Steve Leialoha

The origin of Gamora